• Many people with chronic pain have never actually had an injury

• Many people merely wake up with pain and try to blame the cause on something they might have done a few days before even if they suffered no pain at the time, or even on the mattress or pillow despite the fact they might have slept on it without any problems for months or even years.

• Many people’s pain begins during an activity that they have done numerous times before without any problem

• Some pain is blamed on doing activities repeatedly (e.g. RSI), yet often these activities have been undertaken for many months, or years, before the pain begins.

• Some conditions are believed to be due to chronic inflammation despite there being no physical evidence of any inflammation.

• There is a widespread belief that if you have an injury, that part of the body becomes weak and is likely to be injured again, despite the fact that we know broken bones heal stronger than before.  These areas might be absolutely fine for months or even years, yet often when doing something routine it will ‘go’ and it will be blamed on the initial trauma.

• Since the 1970’s research into MRI scans of spines has shown that whether or not you have pain you are just as likely to have degeneration.  In fact one study concluded, ‘“Degenerative disc disease, as seen on imaging, is not a painfulcondition.” (Ann Rheum Dis.2003; 62: 371-372 Centeno and Fleishman) Research into MRI scans

• Pain often moves around the body and is not consistent with any specific diagnosis.

• Often symptoms do not match a given diagnosis.  e.g. referred symptoms thought to be due to the pressure of a prolapsed disc onto a specific spinal nerve on one side of the spine often cover a number of nerve patterns and might even swap from one leg to the other.

• Pain is often blamed on a specific structural ‘abnormality’ which is constant (e.g. arthritis or a curvature of the spine), yet the pain varies or might even disappear for long periods at a time.

• There is a widespread belief that poor core stability will cause pain, yet there is no correlation between core strength and pain.

• Often even severe pain can disappear or be noticeably reduced when an individual is completely distracted by something.

• 21% of frequent attenders to GP practices have medically unexplained symptoms. In other words, no physical cause can be found for their symptoms.

• People often blame recurring episodes of neck pain on a whiplash injury suffered many years previously, even though they might go months or years between episodes and have had no further injury.

To learn about some of the other main pain epidemics on the western world and how you can resolve them, please click below:

• Repetitive Strain Injury

• Low Back Pain

• Fibromyalgia

• Whiplash

• Sciatica